LOVE The Beat Goes On is my first memoir. It was difficult to write at times. But when your doctor gives you a “6-months to live” diagnosis in 2008, I thought writing my memoir would be an inspiration to others. I felt compelled to share HOPE.

The easy part was telling the story. But here are the things that really make it hard:

  1. When you write a memoir, there’s nowhere to hide.
  2. Be authentic. If you are bull-xxiting, the reader will know it.
  3. Is it true to life? Well if you’ve ever been in an argument with your partner/spouse/lover/sibling you know we all see the same thing from a different point of view.

It’s also difficult because you get a judgment on yourself. Think about that. I’ve got 16 books published on Amazon. That’s a lot of writing, a lot of readers, fans, reviews. And one negative review sticks out. The person who wrote the review said I was a “woman of passion and privilege.” I loved the passion because this is very true. But the privilege? I can’t tell you how much that hurt. I’m an army brat, child of an alcoholic father. I had a life of loneliness and horrific family arguments in my teenage years. Everything I ever got I worked my butt off to achieve. But when you put yourself out there, people will react to your narrative in different ways.

So, is it sensationalized or true to his or her life?

Your question intrigued me. I’m currently writing a second memoir. I sold everything last year 2019. I was living in Mexico, gave up my career in sales, and decided to travel to Europe, India, Asia, Malaysia and the Middle East. My entire world has been turned upside down for that decision. I now live in Istanbul, Turkey, and am in love with a man who is decades younger than me. Do I have a story to share? Oh yeah. I don’t need to sensationalize it.

My life is incredibly amazing and I’ve been blessed with the best and worst events. But I wouldn’t trade any of it. Not one single thing. I hope the authenticity of my words will shine through on the final draft of my manuscript. I can’t wait to share my story with the world.

We all have a story to share. Maybe you will be next.

Day 36/37 I’ve lost count. Lockdown in Istanbul if you are over 65. My first stop when they lift this quarantine will be the hairdressers!

Thanks for reading.

8 thoughts on “Memoir: How much of a person’s life is sensationalized or true to his or her life?

    1. I guess it’s all in how we look at life. I’ve had so many ups and downs in my life but choose to find the good or benefits,right? Maybe it’s only about jealousy. Who knows… The sad thing is that I allowed myself to remember it.

      Like

      1. Yes.
        But there may be another way of looking at this:
        Beyond being sad, perhaps it’s also a HEALTHY thing that you remembered it?
        Attentive self esteem defends us.
        We exist because our ancestors paid careful attention to the attitudes of others.
        As words can express fine nuances of hostility, and rhetorical ways to put people down.
        In a less civilized situation, the critical attitudes of others could lead to actual danger.
        And so it might be inherently useful to remember who our critics are, even if we would sooner forget?

        Liked by 1 person

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