Marketing on FB? A must read!

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via 5 Facebook Tips To Help With Your Book Marketing  by Nicholas C. Rossis

Tip #1: Images Posted Via Instagram Receive More Engagement

Tip #2: Posts With Hashtags Receive Less Engagement

Tip #3: Save Links For Later

Tip #4: Almost Half Of Facebook’s Users Are Mobile Only

Tip #5: Facebook’s Audience Is Growing Up In Western Markets

Thanks, Nicholas C. Rossis for this timely and enlightening piece.

ALSO:

Check out Gisela Hausmann’s latest book in her series the Little Blue Book for Authors 101 Clues to get more out of Facebook  

“Having read and learned (and been entertained) by eleven of Gisela’s many books, it is comfortable to admit that I always learn something fresh and valuable from her expertise and coaching. As a fellow reviewer on both Amazon and Goodreads it is fascinating to discover the depth of her experience and insights into the functioning of creating and subsequently marketing books – all the ins and outs, dos and don’ts she shares are astonishingly helpful.” from Grady Harp top Amazon Reviewer

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What would you do?

 

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1. What is your idea of success?

Sometimes your failure–for trying–is better than someone else’s success in staying where he/she is. There’s nothing sadder than hearing an older person say: “I wish I had…” “I should have tried…” “I always wanted to…” “Why didn’t I… when I had the opportunity?”

2. It’s okay to crawl and crawl some more…

This one is particularly hard for me. I come from the generation of women who believed we could have it all. And then we found out that having it all meant not all things worked out. Marriages failed, businesses went bankrupt and children didn’t always fill that void in your heart for being needed and loved. But still, we tried and for that, we have no regrets.

Wanting something and not giving up, often times means we have to crawl or take baby steps when in reality we want to LEAP!

3. Know you will have setbacks… and do it anyway.

I’ve done many things in my life. Most have been somewhat within my control. Choosing to put my writing out there took courage. I remember the first reviews of my first novella, JET. I had a troll. I didn’t even know what that was. Let me explain. It’s someone who reviews your work and leaves hurtful remarks, and what he/she hopes will derail your current and future efforts. He hated my story so much that he actually bought the second in the series so he could hate on that one too! Hah, that’s when I caught on. I kept writing them anyways! I believed in my work and my fans love them and ask for more! They’re successful Kindle World novellas. Amazon sees the fans reactions and reviews and promotes them. And I get lost in JET’s world when I write them.

JET-DISPLACED is 4th in the Series and JET-Reborn (will be out in two weeks) now published!

4. Be open to criticism.

I cringed when I received criticism for one of my books. Now as I continue to become a better writer, I’m grateful for comments that rang true to me–even if I didn’t want to hear them at the time. Reviews have helped me grow and encouraged me beyond measure. Without the great reviews I receive, I would stop publishing. It’s not easy to break through in 2018. It requires an attitude of “this is what I was born to do, and I will continue, even if no one buys a single book.”

5. Find those who have succeeded in your field and don’t be afraid to ask for help or advice.

Authors can be the most gracious or the nastiest friends you can have. Search out the ones and the groups who are friendly and encouraging. And remember, we are all so busy that we can’t always do the things you request but we can point you in the right direction.  For me, that amazing group has been #RRBC. The members are caring, supportive and talented. They don’t talk their talk, they just DO IT!

6. If you want it bad enough, remember…

The story goes that Colonel Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, presented his concept/sauce/chicken and was rejected one thousand and nine times before he received a yes!

We are not interested in science fiction which deals with negative utopias. They do not sell.” Stephen King’s Carrie sells 1 million in the first year alone.

“Frenetic and scrambled prose.” Viking Press disagree and publish one of the most influential novels of all time. Since 1957 it has regularly sold at least 60,000 copies every year. Which has seen On The Road by Jack Kerouac, become a multi-million best-seller.

31 publishers in a row turn down The Thomas Berryman Number. It wins the Edgar for Best Novel becoming a best-seller for James Patterson. An author with 19 consecutive number #1′s on the New York Times best-seller list and sales of 220 million

16 literary agencies and 12 publishers reject A Time To Kill. Its modest print run of 5000 quickly sells out, as it goes on to become a best-seller for its author: John GrishamCombined sales of 250 million.

7. Regrets are worse than never taking the chance.

When my children were babies, I remember reading a story to them called The Little Engine That Could (1906 original story). It’s a children’s book with the graphics of a little engine trying to make its way up a hill. It’s so small and the hill is so large, and the poor little engine is so tiny. It’s impossible, says everyone. But the little engine kept saying “I think I can…I think I can…” and chugged along slowly and methodically. When I crested the hill, it chugged out the worlds: “I thought I could, I thought I could, I thought I could!”

So this Sunday morning I write this blog first, for me, and second, for YOU!

Don’t give up. The world is waiting to hear from you!

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You “Reach” Me

Do you have authors that you love? You’re so obsessed with their work that you’ll read anything they write? These authors are my Saturday-night-dates and my all-nighters. And they are the only guys occupying my bed these days–by choice!

#1 is Lee Child #2 Daniel Silva #3 David Baldacci #4, Russell Blake. I could go on but you can see I have a type.

I published my first novella JET-Exposed, fan-fiction for Kindle Worlds in 2015. I have four novellas now based on the USA Today Bestselling author, Russell Blake ‘s JET Series  One of my first reviewers wrote:

Lynda Filler: “The author’s style is reminiscent of Clive Cussler, Lee Childs or Baldacci.” Her words motivate and inspire me to do a better job with each book that I write. 
I answer questions on Quora. The number one question to show up on my page every other day is: How do I become a good writer? And the answer is: READ! And of course, WRITE. Read anything that appeals to you. I inhale my books. They become part of my writing DNA. I write what I love to read. And when I can’t write, I get that craving… like something’s missing in my life.
I started the latest Jack Reacher (#22) last night. I will finish it today. Usually, I go right through it in a day. But I wanted to savor this one. It’s his best Reacher yet! Others may not agree. But I’m sure you never think of highlighting a fast-paced mystery/suspense book…but this one is all (kindle) marked up. The Midnight Line does all the things I love. It addresses a serious social issue: the opioid epidemic. And another cause, obviously close to Lee Child’s heart–what happens to our veterans when they return from war zones and get out of the military?
This novel reached out to me, grabbed my heart and had me in tears. There’s something so much deeper than mere entertainment going on this novel.
It’s the best Reacher yet!

 

Why is Harry Potter by JKRowlings so successful?

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How do you plot? Or do you? When I wrote my first novella, JET-Exposed fanfiction for Russell Blake’s JET  series I followed his direction and plotted. I use an Excel spread sheet and then refer back for each subsequent JET story when plotting the next.

I discovered this screenshot of JK Rowling‘s method amongst over 10,000 photos. I have no idea where I found it but could be on one of the news sites. Credit goes to some amazing author who shared this. I hope it inspires.

I’ve recently come across a book recommended by Toby Neal USA Today Best Selling Author, who loves and uses the methods described in Take Off Your Pants! Outline Your Books For Faster Better Writing. by Libbie Hawker. I will definitely incorporate her ideas into my plotting. https://goo.gl/ASBJAK

When JKR wrote the first Harry Potter book she used a typewriter. This one above is the handwritten plotting for her fifth book. I wonder if she’s moved to a computer yet. Either way, she’s written the most compelling stories so there’s something to be gained by plotting. Do you agree?

20 Writing Tips from Fiction Authors

 

Writing success boils down to hard work, imagination and passion—and then some more hard work. iUniverse Publishing fires up your creative spirit with 20 writing tips from 12 bestselling fiction authors.

Use these tips as an inspirational guide—or better yet, print a copy to put on your desk, home office, refrigerator door, or somewhere else noticeable so you can be constantly reminded not to let your story ideas wither away by putting off your writing.

Tip1: “My first rule was given to me by TH White, author of The Sword in the Stone and other Arthurian fantasies and was: Read. Read everything you can lay hands on. I always advise people who want to write a fantasy or science fiction or romance to stop reading everything in those genres and start reading everything else from Bunyan to Byatt.” — Michael Moorcock

Tip 2: “Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.” — Zadie Smith

Tip 3: “Introduce your main characters and themes in the first third of your novel. If you are writing a plot-driven genre novel make sure all your major themes/plot elements are introduced in the first third, which you can call the introduction. Develop your themes and characters in your second third, the development. Resolve your themes, mysteries and so on in the final third, the resolution.” — Michael Moorcock

Tip 4: “In the planning stage of a book, don’t plan the ending. It has to be earned by all that will go before it.” — Rose Tremain

Tip 5: “Always carry a note-book. And I mean always. The short-term memory only retains information for three minutes; unless it is committed to paper you can lose an idea for ever.” — Will Self

Tip 6: “It’s doubtful that anyone with an internet connection at his workplace is writing good fiction.” — Jonathan Franzen

“Work on a computer that is disconnected from the internet.” — Zadie Smith

Tip 7: “Interesting verbs are seldom very interesting.” — Jonathan Franzen

Tip 8: “Read it aloud to yourself because that’s the only way to be sure the rhythms of the sentences are OK (prose rhythms are too complex and subtle to be thought out—they can be got right only by ear).” — Diana Athill

Tip 9: “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” – Anton Chekhov

Tip 10: “Listen to the criticisms and preferences of your trusted ‘first readers.'” — Rose Tremain

Tip 11: “Fiction that isn’t an author’s personal adventure into the frightening or the unknown isn’t worth writing for anything but money.” — Jonathan Franzen

Tip 12: “Don’t panic. Midway through writing a novel, I have regularly experienced moments of bowel-curdling terror, as I contemplate the drivel on the screen before me and see beyond it, in quick succession, the derisive reviews, the friends’ embarrassment, the failing career, the dwindling income, the repossessed house, the divorce . . . Working doggedly on through crises like these, however, has always got me there in the end. Leaving the desk for a while can help. Talking the problem through can help me recall what I was trying to achieve before I got stuck. Going for a long walk almost always gets me thinking about my manuscript in a slightly new way. And if all else fails, there’s prayer. St Francis de Sales, the patron saint of writers, has often helped me out in a crisis. If you want to spread your net more widely, you could try appealing to Calliope, the muse of epic poetry, too.” — Sarah Waters

Tip 13: “The writing life is essentially one of solitary confinement – if you can’t deal with this you needn’t apply.” — Will Self

Tip 14: “Be your own editor/critic. Sympathetic but merciless!” — Joyce Carol Oates

Tip 15: “The reader is a friend, not an adversary, not a spectator.” — Jonathan Franzen

Tip 16: “Keep your exclamation points under control. You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose. If you have the knack of playing with exclaimers the way Tom Wolfe does, you can throw them in by the handful.” — Elmore Leonard

Tip 17: “Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.” — Neil Gaiman

Tip 18: “You know that sickening feeling of inadequacy and over-exposure you feel when you look upon your own empurpled prose? Relax into the awareness that this ghastly sensation will never, ever leave you, no matter how successful and publicly lauded you become. It is intrinsic to the real business of writing and should be cherished.” — Will Self

Tip 19: “The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.” — Neil Gaiman

Tip 20: “The nearest I have to a rule is a Post-it on the wall in front of my desk saying ‘Faire et se taire’ (Flaubert), which I translate for myself as ‘Shut up and get on with it.’” — Helen Simpson

Even famous authors sometimes have a tough time with writing; they also go through periods of self-doubt. Despite this, they always manage to come up with the goods. So take a lesson from them and stop putting off your writing plans and get started on your publishing journey today.

There has never been a better time than now to realize your dream of becoming a published author. Let your voice be heard and let your story be told. Never let your passion for writing wane. Let iUniverse help you achieve your ambitions »

http://www.iuniverse.com/expertadvice/20writingtipsfrom12fictionauthors.aspx