If you’ve always wanted to write, here’s how I started.

I started with Xposed the first book in the Code Raven Series. I had so much fun creating Luke Raven, Samaar and their cohorts (billionaire patriot, spies, ex-SEALS, ex-Mossad agent, a brilliant techie)that I wanted to keep on writing! My readers loved it and it was really their comments “What’s next?” “I can’t wait to read more!” “I’m addicted to Luci/Samaar” that determined the direction of the stories.

I thought it would be a one-off book (Xposed) but by the third one, I knew I needed to do a Prequel. So I wrote the background story, how Raven made his billions and the horrific event that propelled him to form his Raven Group.

The series started as novellas, morphed into full novels because that’s what my readers asked for. Now I use this prequel for anyone new to the series to set the stage. With the prequel, a reader can start anywhere in the series and still enjoy the exciting ride. There’s a link to the free prequel on my Bio.

If you click on my profile you will find a link to my Amazon page for 16 books that I’ve written. I also found in my contemporary romance books that one was not enough. I think today’s market is accustomed to series, episodes like Netflix and Prime and they want more than a one-off book. I also wrote a memoir about the time in my life in 2008 when I was given 6 months to live! And in the past month, I’ve written a second memoir about the last 14 months of my life! I sold everything I owned in Mexico and bought a one-way ticket to multiple destinations in the world. I thought I might settle and write in Bali. I never made it there. I fell in love with a guy and a city, Istanbul, and here I am!

Whatever you decide to do, if you would like your work to be commercial, think about your audience. Who are your writing for and what will they expect from your genre?

And most of all, have fun!

On how to improve your writing skills

 

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I’ve been asked on Quora how I improve my writing skills. A good question don’t you think?

 

  1. Writing is learned by reading—and writing. So the first thing to do would be to read more. This month I will produce a 25000-word novella—I’m at 8000 words today, and I will probably have read 6 novels or more before year-end.
  2. I have over 650,000 views on my Quora answers. I started writing on here a few months ago, I think in the summer. I always write my answer on this page, then copy/paste to Word to check grammar and spelling. As an author I have certain mistakes I make over and over again—a stubborn slow learner. Then I correct the essay and copy/paste back. In these last few months, my organizational skills have improved, my sentence structure and grammar have advanced. Now I can write an answer and if I’m in a hurry, I post. Quora has definitely helped me work on my writing skills.
  3. If you have a style like I do, or your writing has been compared to certain authors, hone your style and do so by reading everything the other mentor/authors have written. For example, with the release of my first novel I was compared to Lee Childs, David Baldacci, and Clive Cussler. Not too shabby. I read the latest Childs and Baldacci books over the past two weeks. So find your style and get better and better at it.
  4. If you are published as I am on Amazon.com: Lynda Filler: Books, Biography, Blog, Audiobooks, Kindle read your reviews. And not just the good ones. I struggled with an aspect of one of my books, the readers picked up on the same challenge. So although my reviews are high 4.4/5 I recognized an issue and I eliminated it in the next book. So fans may love your message but are quick to let you know where you can improve. They will let you know what you do right and what you do wrong. They offer invaluable feedback.