Writing fanfiction is against the law. Should fanfiction authors be held to account for their copyright violations?

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I visited Quora tonight to answer this question. I think my answer will surprise the readers and should generate plenty of comments in the next 24 hours. Especially since 99.9% will disagree with me.

Here it is!

Now I have an entirely different response to this question. The premise of the question is debatable according to the agreements I signed with Amazon and JET author Russell Blake.

In 2015 Amazon Kindle Worlds went into contract with RB of the USA Today Best Selling series JET, to produce and pay the original author a portion of the proceeds for fan fiction. I was one of the first authors invited to write into his world. He and I were both paid for every novella that was sold in his “JET World.” It turned out to be a great opportunity for me. I piggy-backed off his exciting character and created my own world around his main heroine.

This year KW was dissolved. We have no idea why. All rights to my characters and stories were mine to keep. At first, I panicked, but I was ready to take my ‘world’ out of the closet and create my own lead character who has blended perfectly with my series. Code Raven, the prequel debuted less than two weeks ago and is already in the top 100 of Amazon shorts alongside James Rollins, Lee Childs, Tami Hoag, and Stephen King!

So this success, although not yet in the same class as E L James, is on its way thanks to the foresight of Amazon to jump on the fanfic bandwagon and pay both the author and the fan/writer.

You can pick up a copy on AMAZON for $.99 cents. Thanks!

 

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Stephen King-Love What You Do

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Yes, I love to share my TOP 10 Lists from Evan Carmichaels YouTube Videos.

Today, it’s Stephen King. If you are a writer, aspiring author or a creative of any type, I think you will love his book On Writing. It’s the one that has influenced me most in my life. I bought it as a gift for my son when he was 15 and showed an interest in writing. He read it and then said, “Mom, you need to read this.” I did, and it’s been my bible ever since. Today I share Stephen King with you. If you click on the link, you can watch the video.

And now, here’s Stephen King’s Top 10 RULES FOR SUCCESS

  1. LOVE WHAT YOU DO
  2. BE YOURSELF
  3. EXPLORE NEW IDEAS
  4. THE GOOD IDEA STAYS WITH YOU
  5. LOVE THE PROCESS
  6. LEARN FROM REJECTIONS
  7. LOOK FOR IDEAS YOU ENJOY
  8. FIND YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS
  9. PASS SOMETHING ON
  10. TELL GREAT STORIES. 

The ones that resonate with me are #2 Be Yourself. I’ve finally gotten over myself and write what I want. Which leads me to #5 Love the Process–even when you’re stuck like I’ve been all day today. UNTIL…that magic moment when the plot reveals itself.

And I also find motivation by reminding myself that my job is #10 Tell Great Stories.

If you have a favorite, share it. And check out Evan Carmichael’s channel. You won’t be disappointed.

Have an exciting, exhilarating, and creative week.

 

Lynda Filler’s most recent novel:  Lie To Me an exposé on sex for money

 

What would you do?

 

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1. What is your idea of success?

Sometimes your failure–for trying–is better than someone else’s success in staying where he/she is. There’s nothing sadder than hearing an older person say: “I wish I had…” “I should have tried…” “I always wanted to…” “Why didn’t I… when I had the opportunity?”

2. It’s okay to crawl and crawl some more…

This one is particularly hard for me. I come from the generation of women who believed we could have it all. And then we found out that having it all meant not all things worked out. Marriages failed, businesses went bankrupt and children didn’t always fill that void in your heart for being needed and loved. But still, we tried and for that, we have no regrets.

Wanting something and not giving up, often times means we have to crawl or take baby steps when in reality we want to LEAP!

3. Know you will have setbacks… and do it anyway.

I’ve done many things in my life. Most have been somewhat within my control. Choosing to put my writing out there took courage. I remember the first reviews of my first novella, JET. I had a troll. I didn’t even know what that was. Let me explain. It’s someone who reviews your work and leaves hurtful remarks, and what he/she hopes will derail your current and future efforts. He hated my story so much that he actually bought the second in the series so he could hate on that one too! Hah, that’s when I caught on. I kept writing them anyways! I believed in my work and my fans love them and ask for more! They’re successful Kindle World novellas. Amazon sees the fans reactions and reviews and promotes them. And I get lost in JET’s world when I write them.

JET-DISPLACED is 4th in the Series and JET-Reborn (will be out in two weeks) now published!

4. Be open to criticism.

I cringed when I received criticism for one of my books. Now as I continue to become a better writer, I’m grateful for comments that rang true to me–even if I didn’t want to hear them at the time. Reviews have helped me grow and encouraged me beyond measure. Without the great reviews I receive, I would stop publishing. It’s not easy to break through in 2018. It requires an attitude of “this is what I was born to do, and I will continue, even if no one buys a single book.”

5. Find those who have succeeded in your field and don’t be afraid to ask for help or advice.

Authors can be the most gracious or the nastiest friends you can have. Search out the ones and the groups who are friendly and encouraging. And remember, we are all so busy that we can’t always do the things you request but we can point you in the right direction.  For me, that amazing group has been #RRBC. The members are caring, supportive and talented. They don’t talk their talk, they just DO IT!

6. If you want it bad enough, remember…

The story goes that Colonel Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, presented his concept/sauce/chicken and was rejected one thousand and nine times before he received a yes!

We are not interested in science fiction which deals with negative utopias. They do not sell.” Stephen King’s Carrie sells 1 million in the first year alone.

“Frenetic and scrambled prose.” Viking Press disagree and publish one of the most influential novels of all time. Since 1957 it has regularly sold at least 60,000 copies every year. Which has seen On The Road by Jack Kerouac, become a multi-million best-seller.

31 publishers in a row turn down The Thomas Berryman Number. It wins the Edgar for Best Novel becoming a best-seller for James Patterson. An author with 19 consecutive number #1′s on the New York Times best-seller list and sales of 220 million

16 literary agencies and 12 publishers reject A Time To Kill. Its modest print run of 5000 quickly sells out, as it goes on to become a best-seller for its author: John GrishamCombined sales of 250 million.

7. Regrets are worse than never taking the chance.

When my children were babies, I remember reading a story to them called The Little Engine That Could (1906 original story). It’s a children’s book with the graphics of a little engine trying to make its way up a hill. It’s so small and the hill is so large, and the poor little engine is so tiny. It’s impossible, says everyone. But the little engine kept saying “I think I can…I think I can…” and chugged along slowly and methodically. When I crested the hill, it chugged out the worlds: “I thought I could, I thought I could, I thought I could!”

So this Sunday morning I write this blog first, for me, and second, for YOU!

Don’t give up. The world is waiting to hear from you!

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On how to improve your writing skills

 

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I’ve been asked on Quora how I improve my writing skills. A good question don’t you think?

 

  1. Writing is learned by reading—and writing. So the first thing to do would be to read more. This month I will produce a 25000-word novella—I’m at 8000 words today, and I will probably have read 6 novels or more before year-end.
  2. I have over 650,000 views on my Quora answers. I started writing on here a few months ago, I think in the summer. I always write my answer on this page, then copy/paste to Word to check grammar and spelling. As an author I have certain mistakes I make over and over again—a stubborn slow learner. Then I correct the essay and copy/paste back. In these last few months, my organizational skills have improved, my sentence structure and grammar have advanced. Now I can write an answer and if I’m in a hurry, I post. Quora has definitely helped me work on my writing skills.
  3. If you have a style like I do, or your writing has been compared to certain authors, hone your style and do so by reading everything the other mentor/authors have written. For example, with the release of my first novel I was compared to Lee Childs, David Baldacci, and Clive Cussler. Not too shabby. I read the latest Childs and Baldacci books over the past two weeks. So find your style and get better and better at it.
  4. If you are published as I am on Amazon.com: Lynda Filler: Books, Biography, Blog, Audiobooks, Kindle read your reviews. And not just the good ones. I struggled with an aspect of one of my books, the readers picked up on the same challenge. So although my reviews are high 4.4/5 I recognized an issue and I eliminated it in the next book. So fans may love your message but are quick to let you know where you can improve. They will let you know what you do right and what you do wrong. They offer invaluable feedback.

What are some good writing tips?

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  1. Write every day. It might be 15 min. on Quora or a blog or a page in your novel, but write. That’s how you get better.
  2. Start with bite-size work. I originally wrote poetry and published 3 books over the years. Then when I got the nerve to go mainstream, I published a novella JET: EXPOSED (Kindle Worlds Novella) (JET WORLD Book 1)First, it was in Kindle Worlds so I was certain someone would read it because it’s fan-fiction from a famous author Russell Blake NYT and USA Best Selling Author. Second, it’s short—30,000 words, fun and not overly challenging. When you do this type of writing, you get instant feedback from fans who will be blunt about your mistakes and praise you if you’re on the right track.
  3. I’m in love with the motivation and inspiration you can find on You Tube. The first video I would recommend is Stephen King. His book is a MUST READ On Writing; but his interviews are extraordinary. Listen, take notes on both style and persistence. A fan reviewed one of my books and compared my style to Lee Childs, David Baldacci and Clive Cussler. So the first is an author I love and I’ve listened to every interview he’s given on You Tube.
  4. Read, read, read, and did I mention read? Imagine. You get to learn your craft by doing something you already love to do, read.
  5. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott is another classic. These are lifesaving books (A. Lamott & S. King) to keep by your side. Inhale every single syllable. When you get stuck or lose motivation, pick one up, read a chapter then go back to work.
  6. “If you want something you’ve never had, you have to do something you’ve never done.” Each writer will have a “something” different that this quote will reference. In my case, some days I get caught up in things that don’t “serve me” or help me build my author business. I know in that moment I have to stop, re-focus and write!

https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-good-writing-tips/answer/Lynda-Filler?share=c8cb2707