If you buy only one book this year, this is the one!

Alex Banayan and Larry King

Life, business, success . . . it’s just like a nightclub. There are always three ways in.

I cannot begin to explain my excitement in discovering this book.

Meet Alex Banayan with Larry King.

He dropped out of Med School when he was 19. He decided that he was dying in Biology classes following a pre-ordained path set by his Iranian Immigrant parents who expected him to be a doctor. He woke up one morning and knew he didn’t want to be a doctor. The disappointment and consequent heartbreak due to his parent’s sacrifice for his education will sound familiar to many. And he had no idea what he wanted to do with his life, but he was passionate about finding out how the great ones started–not what made them successful, there’s a lot written about that. But how did super successful get that first break? 

My enthusiasm for this book and the interviews I’ve listened to have brought both tears and tons of inspiration, into my life. It doesn’t matter what stage of life you’re in, what age, or what career choice you’ve made, this story is for you. And if you have children or partners struggling with life decisions, buy this book for them too. 

I can’t wait to hear what you think.

There’s the First Door: the main entrance, where 99 percent of people wait in line, hoping to get in. The Second Door: the VIP entrance, where the billionaires and celebrities slip through. But what no one tells you is that there is always, always . . . the Third Door. It’s the entrance where you have to jump out of line, run down the alley, bang on the door a hundred times, crack open the window, sneak through the kitchen–there’s always a way.  

The Founders Of The World’s Five Largest Companies All Follow The 5-Hour Rule

Screen Shot 2018-08-10 at 8.21.22 AM

Bill Gates. Steve Jobs. Warren Buffett. Jeff Bezos. Larry Page. They are all polymaths too.

by Michael Simmons, Serial Entrepreneur, Bestselling Author, Contributor To Fortune, Forbes, HBR, Time, & Many More

(reblog from Thrive Global)

The founders of the five largest companies in the world — Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Warren Buffett, Larry Page, and Jeff Bezos — all share two uncommon traits. After studying self-made billionaires for many years now, I believe that these two traits are responsible for a lot of their wealth, success, impact, and fame. In fact, I put so much faith in these two traits that I’ve used them in my own life to start companies, be a better writer, be a better husband, and achieve financial security.

Here are the two traits:

  1. Each of them is a voracious learner.
  2. Each of them is a polymath.

Let’s unpack these two terms, and learn a few simple tips for using them in your own life.

First, the definitions. I define a voracious learner as someone who follows the 5-hour rule — dedicating at least five hours per week to deliberate learning. I define a polymath as someone who becomes competent in at least three diverse domains and integrates them into a skill set that puts them in the top 1% of their field. If you model these two traits and you take them seriously, I believe they can have a huge impact on your life and really accelerate your success toward your goals. When you become a voracious learner, you compound the value of everything you’ve learned in the past. When you become a polymath, you develop the ability to combine skills, and you develop a unique skill set, which helps you develop a competitive advantage.

By Bill Gates’ own estimate, he’s read one book a week for 52 years, many of them having nothing to do with software or business. He also has taken an annual two-week reading vacation for his entire career. In a fascinating 1994 Playboy interview, we see that he already thought of himself as a polymath:

PLAYBOY: Do you dislike being called a businessman?

GATES: Yeah. Of my mental cycles, I devote maybe ten percent to business thinking. Business isn’t that complicated. I wouldn’t want to put it on my business card.

PLAYBOY: What, then?

GATES: Scientist. Unless I’ve been fooling myself. When I read about great scientists like, say, Crick and Watson and how they discovered DNA, I get a lot of pleasure. Stories of business success don’t interest me in the same way.

The fact that Gates considers himself a scientist is fascinating given that he dropped out of college and had spent his whole life in the software industry at that point.

Interestingly, Elon Musk doesn’t consider himself a businessman either. In this recent CBS interview, Musk says he thinks of himself as more of a designer, engineer, technologist, and even wizard.

The list goes on. Larry Page has been known to spend time talking in depth with everyone from Google janitors to nuclear fusion scientists, always on the lookout for what he can learn from them.

Warren Buffett has pinpointed the key to his success this way: “Read 500 pages every day. That’s how knowledge works. It builds up, like compound interest.”

Jeff Bezos has built his whole company around learning on a massive scale via experimentation and has also been an avid reader his whole life.

Finally, Steve Jobs famously combined various disciplines and looked at it as Apple’s competitive advantage, going so far as to say:

“Technology alone is not enough. It’s technology married with the liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields the results that makes our hearts sing.”

And, of course, the founders of these five companies aren’t the only massively successful individuals who share these two traits. As I’ve written about before, if we expanded the list to a sample of other self-made billionaires, we quickly see Oprah Winfrey, Ray Dalio, David Rubenstein, Phil Knight, Howard Marks, Mark Zuckerberg, Elon Musk, Charles Koch, and many others share similar habits.

Why would some of the busiest people in the world invest their most precious resource — time — into learning about topics seemingly unconnected to their fields, like fusion power, font design, biographies of scientists, and doctors’ memoirs?

Each of them commands organizations of thousands of the smartest people in the world. They’ve delegated almost every task in their lives and businesses to the best and brightest. So why have they held on to this intense amount of learning?

After writing several articles attempting to answer these questions, this is what I’ve ultimately come to:

At the highest levels, learning isn’t something you do to prepare for your work. Learning is the most important work. It is the core competency to build. It’s the thing you never delegate. And it’s one of the ultimate drivers of long-term performance and success.

As I came to this realization, I wondered: Why isn’t it obvious that we should all become voracious learners and polymaths throughout our whole lives given that we live in an increasingly complex, rapidly changing, advanced-knowledge economy? Why does the average person think of deliberate learning as an optional thing to do on the side?

I think it’s because of three strong messages we’ve all been taught — in school, in college, and in general society — that may have been true in the past but are definitely no longer true. Here’s how these three lies break down:

  • Lie #1: Disciplines are the best way to categorize knowledge.
  • Lie #2: Most learning happens in school/college.
  • Lie #3: You must pick one field and specialize in it.

These beliefs are so insidious that they’ve destroyed our intuition about learning and knowledge, and they ultimately hold us back from creating the success we want. If we can become aware of them, we can rectify them, just as the most successful people in the world have done.

To continue with this insightful article please go to THRIVE GLOBAL (Arianna Huffington founder of  HuffPost) for more!

 

29 Life-Changing Lessons That Will Make You Successful And More Strategic

There is this myth that mentors are people you have to know and see.

That it is some official designation to seek out. I’ve never met Tyler Cowen, the bestselling author, economist, and thinker. We’ve never spoken on the phone. Our longest email conversation might have been three sentences. Yet he has been one of the most significant influences in the education and evolution of my life. By every definition, he’s been what you would call a mentor.

Lately, I’ve been trying to write about all the ways people have helped me. It’s been an exercise in gratitude but also articulation — in writing it down, I am remembering it and codifying it so I never forget the lessons. Below are just some of the things I’ve learned from this polymathic professor of economics, voracious reader and contrarian philosopher. Maybe you’ll be lucky enough to meet him one day (I hope I am) but even if you don’t, he can still be your mentor.

Below are 29 lessons I learned from Tyler over the last 10 years. Hope you gain from them as much as I have.


1. See Yourself Afresh — This is one of my favorite quotes from Tyler: “Treat yourself like a piece of your writing which you set aside for a week so you could look at it fresh.”

2. Being Curious Is a Career — It was crazy to me at first that Tyler got to do what he did for a living: write blog posts, read books, have ideas. That’s what I wanted to do. I think the way you get paid to do that is by making that curiosity valuable to other people: Tyler blogs every day and his links and questions help people do their jobs, his books propose provocative big ideas, his podcast is entertaining and important. You can’t just nerd out — there has to be value creation

3. Complacency Is the Enemy — Tyler’s newest book (which is awesome) is about all the ways that society has become complacent. We accept the status quo, we don’t want to disrupt it. People move less, change careers less, change their minds less, live in less diverse places, riot less than they used to. I’ve done most of those things in my life (except the last one), it’s how you keep things interesting and find opportunities. Point being: Don’t worry as much about disruption and chaos — it might simply mean interesting things are happening — fear stability and complacency because it means decay.

4. Seek Out Quake Books — When I was 19 or 20, Tyler talked to me about the concept of “quake books” — books that shake you to your core. As he wrote in his 2007 email to me: “I would more likely intensively engage with some important book totally full of new ideas. Hayek. Parfit. Plato. And so on. There just aren’t books like that left for me anymore. So I read many more, to learn bits, but haven’t in years experienced a ‘view quake.’ That is sad, to me at least, but I don’t know how to avoid how that has turned out. So enjoy your best reading years while you can!”

5. What’s the Cost of This Fight? — There is a line in one of Tyler’s books where he talks about fighting with a spouse over a couch (or something like that). He says that maybe you like your idea 20% more than her/his idea, so you fight and win. Now you’re a little bit happier. But what did that victory cost you in terms of an unhappy spouse? Is it worth more or less than how much you value your opinion over the couch? I never would have thought about it that way — I can’t tell you how many arguments this has saved me. (The answer is ‘not enough.’)

6. Expectations Are the Enemy in (Long Distance) Relationships — I was in a long distance relationship in 2006 when I read Tyler’s post on them. It was another brilliant perspective that helped me relax and made things better. I ended up marrying that girl a decade later. Thanks, Tyler!

7. Know What is Scarce — “In today’s global economy here is what is scarce: 1. Quality land and natural resources 2. Intellectual property, or good ideas about what should be produced. 3. Quality labor with unique skills.” I framed the longer passage this line is from and I have it above my desk as a daily reminder. It comes from Average is Over — another absolutely amazing book.

8. To Speed Read, Read A Lot — How do you become a better and more prolific reader? I’ll let Tyler tell you: “The best way to read quickly is to read lots. And lots. And to have started a long time ago. Then maybe you know what is coming in the current book. Reading quickly is often, in a margin-relevant way, close to not reading much at all.”

9. Knowledge Compounds — I think what he’s also saying there is that the value of reading compounds over time. Reading more makes you a better and faster reader, learning about stuff makes it easier and faster for you to learn more.

10. Your Life Is Not a Story — Tyler has observed that most people describe their lives as stories and journeys. But giving in to this temptation can be dangerous. Narratives often lead to an overly simplistic understanding of events, causes, and effects — and, often, to arrogance.

11. Move to Texas — In 2013, Tyler wrote a Time cover story about why everyone was moving to Texas. That’s not quite why I moved to Austin but it didn’t hurt.

12. When Traveling, Pretend You’re A Thief — I like his trick when visiting museums: Pretend you’re a thief who is casing the joint. It changes how you perceive and remember the art. Try it.

13. Just Go — Another travel tip from Tyler: “My main tip is simply: “Go, go go!” Go. People have a status quo bias when they make decisions and they don’t take enough chances.”

14. Read However You Want — People are amazed at how much Tyler reads (it’s a lot) but they miss that he has his own set of rules for doing it. He skips around. He quits books he doesn’t like. He might read a novel from only the perspective of one of the characters. He’ll ruin the ending. He just does whatever — and so you should you. This isn’t for a test. It’s for your own enjoyment (he does the same with movies apparently).

15. Be a Good (But Quiet) Family Man — Even though Tyler talks about all sorts of parenting stuff in his books, it really never occurred to me that he had kids until I heard him mention something about it on his podcast. I don’t think I’ve ever read anything about his wife. I have a lot of respect for people who have families…but don’t parade them around like some trophy. He has a family, it’s important to him, but that’s his business. It’s how I try to live my life too.

16. Really Understand Other People’s Work — What you’ll hear when you listen to Tyler’s podcast is just how deeply he has set out to understand the work of the person he’s talking to. I think in some ways he understands the arc of the person’s career better than they do. This is a special skill. It requires getting out of your own head and actually thinking about someone else (that’s not something podcasts are known for…).

17. Read Eclectically — Another reading rule: Check out a couple of these most recent “What I’m Reading” posts from Tyler. Look at how diverse the subject matter is. Books about far-right politics in Europe, the diary of a Stalin ambassador, histories of the Irish border, a book on the quartet of Alexander Hamilton, George Washington, John Jay, and James Madison, one right after another.

18. Money Can Sap Motivation — In Discover Your Inner Economist, Tyler writes about how he tried to incentivize his step-daughter to do the dishes so he resorted to paying her, which got her to wash them — but it worked only for a week. “I knew this could happen. I understood that there is such a thing as intrinsic motivation and that if you pay people, you might weaken that. What I didn’t really get was the control issue. That when you start paying people to do a thing, they often see it as control.” (The story has a happy ending: She started washing the dishes for free after reading the book.)

19. Order Weird Stuff on the Menu — If the weird thing wasn’t good, goes his logic, the chef probably wouldn’t have been allowed to put it on there. Sure — I’ll buy it.

20. Don’t Be Afraid to Have a Partner — Tyler’s site, Marginal Revolution, has a co-writer named Alex Tabarrok. He’s the unsung hero of that site and many of his articles are longtime favorites of mine. You don’t have to do everything yourself. In fact, you should have intellectual and creative partners. It’s powerful.

21. Write The Opposing View — It’s not just enough to think about how other people might think. One of his more recent opinion pieces shows how far Tyler is willing to go when it comes to empathy: He suggests actually writing — as if it’s you — an article with someone else’s opinion. See if you can explain why Trump is doing this or that, or why your parents believe this or that. Feel those words coming through your fingers — do you understand them better? Are things less contentious? I love this idea.

22. How to Thoughtfully Disagree — I’ve read a lot of Tyler Cowen writing over the years. Tyler is smart, opinionated and contrarian. It occurs to me there is one thing I’ve never seen from Tyler: contemptuous dismissal of anyone else. That’s something I know I need to work on. I take things too seriously, I condescend, I speak with undeserved certainty. Meanwhile, Tyler entertains basically everything. He’s friendly even when he disagrees. He’s open-minded. It’s a great model for any aspiring thinker.

23. Think Rationally, Not Emotionally — Two interesting posts from Tyler stand out to me, both about Peter Thiel. One was after the Gawker lawsuit, where Tyler stripped the emotion out of the debate and just looked at how third-party funding works and how common it is. Two, after Peter’s controversial comments in the New York Times about whether there is “too little” or “too much” corruption, Tyler actually tried to figure out what the guy was talking about (it’s actually kind of interesting). Point being: Don’t get caught up in outrage or emotions, earnestly try to figure stuff out.

24. Cultivate Young Smart People — Like I said, I don’t know Tyler, but he’s nice enough to occasionally answer my emails. I know he answers emails from people like Ben Casnocha and Cal Newport and I’m sure there are hundreds — if not thousands — of young people he’s helped over the years (students or otherwise). He doesn’t need to do this but he does. It’s paying it forward.

25. Watch One TV Show at a Time — Tyler has a great rule about not watching more than one big TV series at a time.

26. Don’t Offer to Work for Free — From Average is Over: “It doesn’t matter how flexible the wage is in the more complex, less brute force jobs. A manual worker who just shows up at your door is probably not someone you want to hire unless it is already part of a preexisting business plan with broad buy-in from your enterprise and your creditors. The worker might say, “I’ll lower my wage demands by thirty percent!” or, “I’ll work for nothing!” It usually won’t matter. The sad reality is that many of these workers you don’t want at all, even if the business plan involves additional labor. Some workers simply aren’t worth the trouble unless the demand for extra labor is truly pressing.”

27. Command Your Audience — I’ve become addicted to Tyler’s podcast. Aside from the conversations, a secondary pleasure is his command over the audience (‘I will cut you off.’ ‘We will be out of this room by 5pm.’) and his very specific questions. His confidence and directness was not something I expected to hear, but it’s impressive. I can’t tell you how many conferences I’ve been to where I wished for someone like that.

28. For Good Food, Go to The Suburbs — As Tyler writes in his rules for dining out, “I love exploring the suburbs for first-rate ethnic food. Many people consider suburbs a cultural wasteland, but I am very happy searching for food in Orange County, California; the area near San Jose; Northern Virginia, near D.C.; Somerville, Massachusetts; and so on. I don’t always pre-Google to find the best place, and I don’t keep tapping on my iPhone. I drive around and keep my eyes open for dining establishments likely to follow the economic rules for good, innovative, and affordable food.”

29. Ask: Do Your Actions Match Your Beliefs? — The Tyler post that has me thinking the most lately is something he said after the election of Donald Trump. A good portion of the country thought Trump was dangerously unfit for office and would enact terrible, destructive policies…yet the markets have steadily gone up. Why don’t we see more people acting on these beliefs? Why aren’t there more short sellers in the market? More doomsday preparations? His point: People love to talk but rarely match their actions with their beliefs. This is both a contradiction or a potential market opportunity. It’s made me re-examine my actions in regards to both.

I could keep going but it might start to seem weird. Besides, the other thing I’ve learned from Tyler is this: keep it short. Almost all his blog posts are pithy — sometimes just a few sentences long. Even his opinion pieces are tight and to the point. So I’ll end it here. If you want to learn from Tyler, go read his stuff. He’s the best.

Like to Read?

I’ve created a list of 15 books you’ve never heard of that will alter your worldview and help you excel at your career.

 


Read a lot? Or you want to expand your horizons?
Lynda Filler’s new Action/Adventure series on AMAZON:
5
xposed

Unlock your passion

Screen Shot 2018-06-16 at 10.52.16 AM

I LOVE every word out of this man’s mouth.

If you haven’t met Jay Shetty, now is your opportunity. Most entrepreneurs talk about their ten rules of success. What I love about Jay’s message is how he blends the HEAD the HEART and the HAND. It’s not just about the intellectual obvious things of success, but following our life’s purpose and then finding our true purpose in making a difference in peoples lives. So if you’re currently in a rut, if you have achieved a level of success in society’s eyes, but you’re not doing something you love, then there is no heartfelt satisfaction in your accomplishment. And in the final analysis, it’s how we share our hearts with the world that truly gives deep and lasting happiness. When we find our true purpose there is something so deep and personal in the gratification we receive that we know in the deepest part of our being, that we are following our life’s purpose.

HEAD: What you want, the way you pick your path, your clarity of vision 

HEART: Understanding your heart and how your heart connects with your vision

HAND: Compassion and care, how we share and pay it forward or give back is where the three things connect and give us true meaning in our lives

When I started to publish my work, poetry was the way I shared my head and my heart. In those days, Myspace was a place for artists where we could connect and share what we felt passionate about. I had so many poems it was easy to look back and connect the dots and realize that each poetry book represented diaries of the life I was living at the time. In 2015 I had an opportunity to connect my vision of what I loved to read and what I wanted to write. So my Heart once again connected with my head and carried me forward. LOVE The Beat Goes On was so much more difficult to write because I laid bare my life, my emotional journey in the hopes it would help others go through their lives. And the payback is in the emails, the FB notes, the complete strangers who reach out and share their pain and how my memoir helped them realize they are not alone. The Hand.

So as difficult as it is to make it as an independent author in a sea of millions of others writing stories, I persevere and nothing can take me off my path. I write to share my vision of the world–as crazy and raunchy as it sometimes gets. I write to entertain, to surprise and sometimes shock because that’s the way of the world. And when my own books have moments of clarity of purpose, insights I never saw coming, I know I’ve found my life’s purpose.

My fondest wish for you today is that you too, find your life’s path and never live with regrets.

Love and gratitude for being part of my world,

Lynda

 

 

One of the things I do on almost a daily basis is “listen” to a YouTube video from Evan Carmichael.

Keep on going

Screen Shot 2018-04-02 at 12.15.23 AM

Whatever your dreams and goals, keep on going.

When I started my author business in the summer of 2015, I had no idea it would grow to 14 publications in 4 genres, Poetry, Action Novellas, Contemporary Fiction, and Memoir. I have at least six more books occupying space in my mind and my heart. How will I ever have the time to get it all done?

I’m sure I’m not the only author, business person, entrepreneur, artist, student, or mother, asking herself this same question. How do we find the time to get it all done? And furthermore, how to do we handle the failure of not getting it all done?

I know Mark Zuckerberg is not a great name this week to bring into the conversation on Success, but in a way, he represents the reality of the journey to success. It will never ever be a straight upward line. There will always be ups and downs, goals reached, others not, disappointments and wins. That’s life.

So this month I set the sales bar for my books higher yet again. No, I didn’t quite make it–off by 5%–but it was my best month ever since I started monitoring my journey. One of my goals though was to have one or all of my JET books in the top twenty at Amazon. JET-Reborn hit #12! So goal achieved. Goals need to be measurable and we need to be accountable for them to be goals. So last summer I started being more organized about how I was going to reach where I knew I wanted to go. It’s been fun. And no matter whether I reach the monthly goal or not, I set the bar higher each month. And I keep on going.

Let me share Mark’s list from Evan Carmichael  

The top 10 rules of success by Mark Zuckerberg.

  1. JUST START
  2. TAKE RISKS
  3. KEEP ON GOING
  4. BE PREPARED TO BE MISUNDERSTOOD
  5. HAVE HEROES
  6. DELIVER VALUE
  7. WORK IN A TEAM
  8. BELIEVE IN YOUR MISSION
  9. HELP OTHERS TO FIND THEIR PURPOSE
  10. REMEMBER WHERE YOU STARTED.

I have two favorites. One, Keep on Going…even in LOVE The Beat Goes On I quote The Little Engine That Could. If you don’t know that children’s book, look it up! And the second is Believe in your Mission. I would go a step further and say, write out your own personal mission statement. What are you trying to achieve, why, and how. It will help to keep your eye on the prize, to keep you focused on your goals.

Have an amazing week and whatever you do, do it with #LOVE and #PASSION.

 

 

Enjoy the journey

is the destination

Inspired by Vashti Q

I think sometimes we are in such a hurry to get “there” that we forget to enjoy the journey.

This past 8 months I set goals for myself. Not only writing goals, projects to accomplish and books to publish, but I attached quantitative unit/financial goals to my writing. I’m enjoying watching the sales growth in all aspects of my business. But also I’m satisfying that business-woman part of me that likes to learn the “why” and the “how” of blogging, newsletters, marketing, FBooking, Twittering…haha, yes, I also have my own creative language that goes with my stats.

I’ve made so many new friends, authors, trainers, teachers, gurus and PA and even VA. If I have to explain those last two terms, you need to email me! And I will give you the pep talk you deserve!! I’ve learned that FB is not just for posting sexy, raunchy photos, witty notes and stunning photos of sunrises…oh, and meeting “interesting” young men. It’s a great place to network and study the habits of highly successful authors who understand and have developed their business to the point where they run financially viable enterprises.

As some of you know, with the introduction of Lie To Me an exposé on sex for money I’ve officially come out of the closet. Yes, I’ve accepted the fact that I might be a romance writer. I thought I was writing suspense, sometimes mystery/suspense and then TARGET in the Sun won Best in Contemporary Fiction 2017– I had to look up the definition of “Contemporary Fiction.” I was about to release Lie to Me and found myself blushing as I described its contents. I’m now able to admit out loud, it’s “steamy.” I’m over myself. I accept the raunchy romantic side of me and gleefully throw my thoughts down on paper and just go for it.

So, after struggling with my internal demands to make my authoring business financially viable, I decided to continue learning, growing and maturing as both a writer and an authorpreneur. And yes, I am truly enjoying the journey. I hope you are too!

“If You Don’t Have TIME, You Don’t Have PRIORITIES!”

TF_031015-102

First of all, thanks to Evan Carmichael and his #Believe network for Tim Ferriss’s 10 Rules for Success Vol. 2. Find Evan on YouTube with new motivational/inspirational videos daily. This site is my first stop every morning before I begin my day!

Let’s take a look at what Tim Ferriss has to say. Many of you will know him for his book The Four Hour Work Week Escape 9-5,

These are Tim’s Top 10 Rules of Success

  1. Ask Great Questions
  2. Start Small
  3. Be Focused
  4. Unplug and Reset
  5. Accept the Collateral Damage
  6. Try the Five Minute Journal Method
  7. Schedule Your Time
  8. Get Feedback
  9. Simplify
  10. Do Acroyoga

 

See the full video here. I know you will be intrigued by his simple concepts. I #LOVE  #5 Accept the Collateral Damage.

Thanks, Evan Carmichael, you are my hero!

 

If You WANT IT…

 

Screen Shot 2018-01-22 at 6.55.16 PM

…Just Keep Doing It

I read recently that the reason the majority of people fail at things in life is that they quit too soon. I know this feeling well. I’ve been writing or should I say publishing, for two years now. I published poetry first in earlier years, but novellas, novels, and my memoir have all been in the last two years, going on three. I found myself sighing in frustration a couple of months ago. I LOVE writing and have no challenges coming up with plots. And I would say that in the last year, my writing is so much better, less disjointed, better focused, and seems to require less editing–another good sign.

However, as an Indie Author, so much of success is attached to marketing and marketing is so time-consuming. There were moments when I allowed the thought to enter my mind to stop. Go back to the joy of writing and story-telling, and forget trying to make it a viable income option. Then I laughed at myself. Really? I’m having far too much fun losing myself in my characters and interacting with readers and of course other authors.

Instead, I decided to make charts and become more aware of my wins. So I keep excel spreadsheets and celebrate each increase every month in all areas of publishing. I’ve become better at organizing and allotting time to each task and I use my Gratitude Jar to deposit slips of papers with my successes every day. A big one was learning to use Mail Chimp and navigating through the process of publishing my first News Letter. And don’t laugh, but after over two years playing with my blog, I finally realized where the “link” symbol is!!! I know you’re smiling. But I’m super proud of myself for that!

One of the things that have helped me be successful at everything I’ve attempted to do is self-belief and self-confidence. I listen to videos (yes, listen) while I put my makeup on in the morning, always eager for motivation and knowledge. That’s one of the reasons I like to share Evan Carmichael’s videos from his Believe Nation YouTube channel. Here’s my latest share for you.

Jim Parsons is an American actor, familiar to many but not to me. I don’t watch TV but rather download programs or catch them on Netflix. I found his attitude refreshing and funny. Here’s his top ten.

  1. JUST BE YOU
  2. JUST KEEP DOING IT
  3. FIND YOUR CALLING
  4. DON’T COMPARE YOUR SUCCESS
  5. SEIZE YOUR MOMENT
  6. FIND YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS
  7. JUST SAY YES!!
  8. GET CONFIDENCE FROM HARD WORK
  9. LOVE STORYTELLING
  10. HAVE FUN

 

Find the interviews here:  https://youtu.be/8_e-m0I288c

If you want it, just keep doing it!

Have a creative week!

 

A slice of my life can be found on Amazon in my memoir LOVE The Beat Goes On.

You want to know his Top 10 Rules of success!!

Screen Shot 2018-01-14 at 9.24.53 PM

He produced his first body of music at 16 years of age! My friends know that DJ Tiesto and house music are my favorites so this young man has caught my attention! I would #LOVE to share his top 10 Rules of success with you.

Martijn Gerard Garritsen (born 14 May 1996), known professionally as Martin Garrix is a Dutch DJ, record producer, and musician. He is ranked number 1 on DJ Mag‘s Top 100 DJs list for 2016 and 2017.[4] In 2016, he founded the label STMPD RCRDS months after leaving Spinnin’ Records, before signing with Sony Music. In 2017, he was announced as a resident DJ at Hï Ibiza.

  1. BELIEVE IN YOURSELF 
  2. FOCUS ON THE POSITIVE
  3. TAKE RISKS
  4. BE YOURSELF
  5. LOVE WHAT YOU DO
  6. PUT YOUR ENERGY IN THE RIGHT PLACE
  7. DEFINE SUCCESS FOR YOURSELF
  8. FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS
  9. KEEP TRYING TO BE BETTER
  10. HAVE FUN!!!!

Screen Shot 2018-01-14 at 9.23.31 PM

Thanks, Evan Carmichael #BELIEVE !!

If you build it they will not come!

 

Screen Shot 2018-01-02 at 12.49.03 PM

I enjoyed an interview with Ryan Holiday today.  He talked about the creative process. We all love to create, but the marketing, not so much. Just because “you built it” doesn’t mean “they will come.”

His take is: Making the Work is 50% Marketing the work is 50%–Two separate marathons. 

When we choose the life of writing, we want to write. We have to write like we have to breathe. Marketing is a time-suck and we resent it. But when we become authors, we also become authorpreneurs. 

He quotes Elon Musk: Being an entrepreneur is like eating glass and staring into the abyss of death. 

Every day I sit down to write/market/blog/learn/improve my skills, I need to organize that day. I need to watch the time sucks–we all know what they are–FB, Twitter, Huffington Post, email. I write the schedule and set a timer to make sure I’m following it!

I’ve added a few more Elon Quotes.

Screen Shot 2018-01-02 at 12.49.46 PM

Screen Shot 2018-01-02 at 12.49.25 PM

Screen Shot 2018-01-02 at 12.50.13 PM

Do you agree?

Let me know what you think in the comments and feel free to share.

#amediting a JET-Reborn. New Release January 2018