WAR!

 

Screen Shot 2018-11-11 at 11.16.35 AM

What do your children pass on the streets on the way home from school?

What would you be prepared to do to save them?

So today I want to honor the victims of war in general. Those who lost family members in the Holocaust, those who lost fathers or grandfathers who fought in the war, and you who will be reading this note and nodding your head. We too are victims. We too suffered the effects of the long-term war.

My father, and uncles participated in World War II. Although I’m Canadian and was not a child of this era, my Dad was in the Royal Canadian Army Signal Corps and was stationed in England.

My father never talked about the war. I remember watching programs on TV with the family years later. But I never really knew what he did. Was he in combat? Was he in an office behind listening devices. Did Dad code, or decode messages? Dad was a recognized Math genius. He entered competitions every year in the military. And my father kept a workroom in every house we lived in, to use his ham radio and talk with people from all over the world. So it’s possible he was involved in things he could never talk about. Or saw horrible deaths that he carried in his mind and heart his whole life. I will never know.

My Dad left a special legacy for us, the children of a parent who fought in the war. His legacy was anger and pain. He drank excessively. He fought with my mother. Although I never saw physical abuse–or maybe I blocked it–my younger sis says she saw marks on my mother’s neck.

I remember Dad drank excessively and by dinner time he was impossible to talk to. We fought all the time. My family dinner memories were of me leaving the table crying. I don’t think I ever finished a meal in my teenage years. My sis remembers only that I was the one who spoke up, so she didn’t have to!

My childhood was not pleasant. I suppose at the time, I didn’t know the difference. It was my reality. But with early blanked memories, I know there were things that happened that my mind has decided I don’t need to remember. And I’m good with that. I was one of the lucky ones. I suffered no long-term effects of that period on my life unless you count several divorces, and the inability to form deep, trusting relationships. I’m sure I’m not alone. Unfortunately, to this day, the men and women who go to war bring it home with them. It’s not their fault, I understand that. And many will get help and life will go on.

I implore legislators around the world, governments, who merely sit in the gilded cages and sign documents allowing militaries to destroy economies and lives, to think, just stop and think, about the ravages of war. Think about our own militaries–my nephew who served several times in Kabul, my SEAL friends who’ve lost their lives and those of their friends. Think about the long-term effect of war zones and war, before you routinely decide to blockade a region, turn off food supplies or close your borders!

Mexico, shame on you for separating men from their families and only permitting women and children to come through on Caravan from war-torn Central America. You must take full responsibility for the kidnapping of 100 women and children this past week. It doesn’t matter that its drug cartels or human trafficking rings, you alone bear the responsibility for leaving them unprotected.

And the US, I have no words for the leadership of the USA. The world once believed it was the greatest nation in the world. Everyone wanted to go to America. And now the best and the brightest from around the world are afraid to join your working ranks. Some refugees have no choice but to flee or die. But others have choices, and they are choosing to seek great job opportunities in other nations, places where they are wanted. If you’re not careful, all that will be left in the USA is the next generation of racists.

So take this moment to put yourself in the shoes or no shoes of the people who are fleeing the countries that in many ways first-world-countries have helped to destroy. Think about bearing responsibility for our actions in all things in life. And show compassion and love today not just for those who have died, but the current victims of war.

Refugee:

A refugee, generally speaking, is a displaced person who has been forced to cross national boundaries and who cannot return home safely. Such a person may be called an asylum seeker until granted refugee status by the contracting state or the UNHCR if they formally make a claim for asylum. UNHRC

Screen Shot 2018-11-11 at 11.04.50 AM

 


If you are curious about a first-hand fictional story of a refugee: mother and child, fleeing Syria read Lynda Filler’s  DISPLACED

DISPLACED-4

Human Rights. Who will speak for those in the caravan?

Screen Shot 2018-11-10 at 8.43.57 AM

Puebla Mexico.

Someone has to speak out for the peoples in the caravans escaping from war-torn brutal violent countries only to find themselves, victims, once more. Yes, call me a bleeding heart; I don’t give a damn! They are human beings just like you and I. The main difference is we get to sit in the comfort of our homes or internet cafes and read about them from a distance.

It’s so easy to ignore their plight, or worse, as in the case of many in the US Administration, to claim they are all rapists and murderers.

But here is what is really happening to those whom no one cares if they live or die:

Reprinted from HP Mexico.com today:

The case of the massive kidnapping of migrants that occurred on November 3 in Veracruz, and that were later turned over to members of organized crime in an unknown place in Puebla, is no longer just the saying of a state ombudsman. Now, it is a case officially investigated by the Attorney General of Puebla, which has evidence of the crime.

In the case file, the Ombudsman for Human Rights of the People of Oaxaca (DDHPO) -a public autonomous body- turned over the testimonies of three witnesses to the kidnapping. One of those people, whose identity remains unknown for their safety, revealed in a sentence the magnitude of what those Central Americans deprived of their freedom in Mexico would be living: “65 children and seven women were sold”.

The new details of the kidnapping suggest that the criminals took advantage of the fact that on the afternoon of November 3, the governor of Veracruz, Miguel Ángel Yunes Linares, withdrew his offer of 150 free trucks so that the caravan would not have to walk to Mexico City. a territory where hundreds have disappeared, a product of the corruption of the municipal police besieged by the war between Los Zetas and the Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generación.

The late announcement of the governor, almost at nightfall, anguished the migrants who would be left out in the open in this dangerous area. Coincidentally, three vehicles arrived to “assist them”: a truck with orange, plate KY 88 765 of the State of Mexico; another, GX 3391C plate from Guerrero; and a truck, plate KXC 7906, according to the investigation.

Unlike the drivers who help the migrants and who use vehicles with the open tray, the box of those trucks was closed with padlocks so that from the outside you could not see what or who was transporting.

We wanted to get to Mexico City quickly, said a woman who is currently in the Ciudad Deportiva shelter in the Mexican capital. A boy dressed in black, chubby, told us that we had to pay 150 pesos. Already by Tierra Blanca, he told us that we had to pay 50 pesos more. We told him that we no longer had money. Passing a bridge and there were eight hooded men. One entered the truck and said that we were all sold. All said: the 65 children and seven women were sold.

These statements coincide with those published today by the veteran journalist Blanche Petrich in the newspaper La Jornada, about the number of children victims of mass kidnapping.

Arturo Peimbert, head of the Ombudsman for Human Rights of the People of Oaxaca, who originally told this story, told HuffPost Mexico on Thursday that he insisted that no one gets into those vehicles, but the desperation and fear of being stranded won to several migrants.

The details of how the witness escaped are not clear. The fear is silenced by some parts of the story, which tomorrow could reach the Attorney General’s Office in the form of a federal complaint.

A second witness of the DDHPO adds more details of what happened that night and says that those responsible would be part of a heavily armed group. The area where they would have been kidnapped is a territory once dominated by Los Zetas.

“We had to walk in front of Tierra Blanca, we usually ordered raite (a free ride) and this is what we did.” A truck stopped, one of those cars was closed and men got out, they were armed and forced many to get on. They went up to about 50, “the statement read.

According to the witnesses, the perpetrators carried long weapons and guarded them all the way to Puebla. Somewhere, near an installation of the Federal Police, the armed commando wanted to change the vehicle victims and there several took the opportunity to flee.

So far, said the ombudsman Arturo Peimbert, nothing is known about the children and women who would be in the power of organized crime. Their fear is that they are victims of illegal activities such as forced labor and sexual exploitation.

Screen Shot 2018-11-10 at 8.44.50 AM

Screen Shot 2018-11-10 at 8.44.10 AM

 


 

About Lynda Filler writes fast-paced page-turners that are based on real-life events happening in the world today. This week she will be in Miami to receive a book award for Contemporary Fiction-Social Issues Lie To Me an exposé on sex for money.

You can find her novels and her memoir on Amazon.

This is the last day for VANISHED in the Sun on sale at .99 cents. It’d dedicated to the Missing 43 Students who commandeered a bus to take part in a march in Mexico City in 2014 and have never been seen since! The UNHRC is still trying to find where their bodies are buried but it’s assumed the bodies have been cremated.